The Medical Educator Tips & Tricks Blog

Where Learning to Teach Happens on Your Schedule

5 Time Hacks for Finding More Time to Teach

We all struggle to find just a few more minutes in our clinical day. Heck, if someone could add just one more hour to each day, I might just be able to eat lunch sitting down (or at all), finish that cup of coffee (I’d have to find it first), and yes, teach more. I won’t pretend that time...

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All A-twitter: 5 Tips to Build Your Twitter Presence as a Medical Educator

This is The Medical Educator's first guest blog post! The author, Kristina Dzara, is a Ph.D. researcher and educator with 5+ years of experience in academic medicine. A recent graduate of the @HarvardMedEd Master’s program and a @HarvardMacy scholar, Kristina’s areas of professional interest...

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Ode to the Anxious Attending-To-Be

I remember my first day as faculty. A new city, a new hospital, a new team. I was terrified. I was pretty sure everyone was staring at me incredulously, unsure how I had made it past the interviews, able to see past the badge with my new title of “Attending Physician” to the quivering...

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The Stories We Tell...And Those We Don't

I have a friend who works in the emergency department and he swears he doesn't have any stories to tell. The thing is, I don't believe him. I don't know how he couldn't have a thousand stories at his fingertips to use as powerful teaching tools if he wanted. But after reflecting on it a bit, I...

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iPhone as Ice Breaker: Using Hand-Held Technology as a Get-To-Know-You Tool

If you’re anything like me, the days and weeks on service seem to fly by. What with seeing all the patients, touching base with consultants, family meetings and the all-important teaching moment squeezed in, there are times when I find it hard to recollect a recent student’s name or any...

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Crystal Clear: Making Your Teaching Transparent

This morning we were in more of a rush than usual getting the kids off to pre-school and I asked my two-year old if he wanted to eat his breakfast in the car. The conversation went something like this: Me: Should we eat on-the-go? Two: On the goat? Me: Yeah, in the car, on the go. Two: I eat...

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Ping-Ponging: A Cooperative Approach to Teaching Different Levels of Learners

The thought of teaching a new topic every single day for every single learner can feel overwhelming. You may think, “How am I going to fit this in every day?” or “I’m not sure I know enough,” or “How can I master that many topics in a way all these learners will grasp?” Indeed, teaching to many...

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10 Strategies for the Struggling Teacher

A week ago, one of you reached out to me, struggling. You bravely and candidly shared your frustrations with the long hours that medicine demands, the desire to teach without any time, the nearly constant pull between more patient care and teaching the learners you are training to provide...

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The Bumblebee Effect

Over the weekend, I stumbled across a wonderful blog post (thank you Rob Rogers!) written by Jennifer Gonzalez called The Marigold Effect. Long story short, it’s about those first years of teaching, how brutal they can be, how much they can make you question what you thought you knew, make you...

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How It All Started

It was 2003. I was a third-year medical student on Internal Medicine and I was on the hunt for a new career. I had originally thought I wanted to do OB/GYN but after six weeks of doing my best not to pass out with nearly every delivery I saw, I decided I needed a new calling and I was pretty...

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